The History of Football (Soccer) in 90 Seconds | Greece to the World Cup | Laughing Historically

The History of Football (Soccer) in 90 Seconds | Greece to the World Cup | Laughing Historically


The History of Football in 90 seconds… that’s
soccer for us Americans! The ancient greeks played a game called Episkyros, which the
Romans would steal (much like they did everything) and call Harpustum. When they invade Britain,
the Romans bring their game with them. In its Earliest form, football was mob-like and
much more violent. Players also used an inflated pig’s bladder and in at least one recorded
case, a human head. In 1308, Irish records tell of a spectator at a football game, being
charged with accidentally stabbing a player. Things get so bad that in 1363, King Edward
III bans cock fighting from the entire country. The pigs and the chickens rejoice, but people
keep playing in secret. 1613, King James officially unbans football, urging everyone to play Sunday
after church. In the 1800’s, English schools start establishing official rules, but not
every school agrees. Rugby School wants a more violent game, where you can pick up the
ball. This evolves into a completely game, which you can guess the name of. However most
children can’t play football, spending six days a week working in factories and inspiring
Charles Dickens novels. This changes with the factory act of 1850. Now children can
only have to work from 6am to 6pm. Big difference! The English start to grow their Empire, bringing
football (and some persecution) around the world! Football becomes so popular that in
1900, it is added to the Olympics. In 1904, France, The Federation International De Football is founded. 1930, FIFA holds its first World Cup in Uruguay, bringing all the nations (on its good side) together in competition. The World Cup has been played every four years ever since!

Antonio Breitenberg

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18 thoughts on “The History of Football (Soccer) in 90 Seconds | Greece to the World Cup | Laughing Historically

  1. Atomic Vixen says:

    I just happen to have a soccer commercial before this.

  2. Brandon Manley says:

    The word Soccer was first used in England and is still used in the US, Australia, and Canada.

  3. 12345soccerguy says:

    "Gets stabbed" * red card *

  4. Buğra Çeri says:

    that is not true

  5. Buğra Çeri says:

    yes?

  6. Alex Davy says:

    Australians calls it Soccer too

  7. Nv BinstylingWc says:

    this some bullshit

  8. manning0 says:

    Football didn't start until 1811 anything before that was completely different and just loosely involved a pigs bladder, the game you're referring to before then is Derby Games and they were essentially riots with a pigs bladder in there somewhere.

  9. 666 says:

    China invented soccer, period.

  10. WZ7C says:

    Americans are the only ones who say soccer the irish say soccer as well

  11. zaggy3110 says:

    It's soccer (in USA, in Canada, in Australia, even in the UK)
    All you whiners are ignorant about the history of sport.
    There are dozens codes of football
    For instance:
    – Gaelic football
    – Australian rules football
    – Rugby football aka Rugby
    – Sheffield rules football
    – Cambridge rules football
    – American football
    – Canadian football
    – International rules football
    – Association football = soccer (corrupt FIFAs game for pussies)
    – etc. etc. etc.

    They all call their own code of football simply "football"

  12. AlphaOmegon & Fulax says:

    lol

  13. AlphaOmegon & Fulax says:

    hey!!!!!!!

  14. Baig The Egg Cool says:

    China actually invented it so go die

  15. Help me reach 1,000 subscribers With 1 video says:

    Guys save yourself 2 full minutes of life and don't watch this.

  16. Cubing Explorer says:

    So not true

  17. IisHypernia says:

    In '2008'*, Irish records tell of a spectator at a football game, being charged with accidentally stabbing a player.

    You got the date wrong.

  18. Luciana Bethers says:

    soccer was not created in china the chinese version died out and did not influence modern soccer

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